SHINGITAI JUJITSU

WELCOME MAT JUDO JUJITSU SAMBO
THE SHINGITAI APPROACH TO TRAINING:  MAKE SHINGITAI YOUR BASE MARTIAL ART 
 
"The principles of Shin (fighting heart or spirit), Gi (a practical emphasis on technical skill) and Tai (physical fitness) are the principles of any good martial artist, grappler or fighter.  While no approach to martial arts training can be complete, our goal in Shingitai is to offer the most practical, effective and technically sound education possible to anyone who chooses to embrace it." 
 
By Steve Scott 
    Every culture since the dawn of mankind has produced some kind of grappling, wrestling or fighting.  It’s human nature to fight, no matter what anyone says.  Whether in personal combat or combat in groups such as armies, humans are good at it.  I’m not saying this to be macho or sound tough.  It’s simply a statement of fact.  
    Some cultures through the ages have made more emphasis than others on fighting and the Japanese tradition of personal and group combat has evolved into a variety of different fighting systems.  Jujitsu, as practiced today, offers a variety of appraoches to personal combat using hand-to-hand fighting skills as well as using weapons.  The feudal jujutsu of Japan transformed into Kodokan Judo in the late 1800s.  While some jujutsu systems remained after Prof. Jigoro Kano organized Kodokan Judo, they were minor in comparison to Kano’s judo.  Prof. Kano was a brilliant organizer, teacher, theorist and technician.  Through his work, Kodokan Judo eventually spread to every corner of the planet.  We will have more on this historical development later in this book, but suffice it to say it was Kano’s judo that laid the path for the modern forms of grappling that evolved as a result of his work.  Kodokan Judo continues to be very popular and is an Olympic sport. Millions of people practice it, but it has also been the genesis of a variety of significantly different grappling styles that were developed in the 20th Century. 
 
     In the former Soviet Union, the rough-and-tumble grappling style of sambo was developed.  Sambo’s roots are in Kodokan Judo as the founder of the Soviet grappling system studied directly under Jigoro Kano, then combined a variety of other wrestling and grappling styles from the various Soviet republics and developed sambo.  In another culture and country, Brazil, the seeds of Kodokan Judo were planted and eventually produced what has become Brazilian Jujitsu.  In our own culture here in the United States, legitimate professional wrestling was widely popular in the early 1900s.  Great wrestlers such as Frank Gotch, Farmer Burns and others  popularized what became known as Catch-as-Catch-Can wrestling.  Before there was professional football, baseball and basketball, the sport of professional wrestling attracted thousands of spectators all across the country.  Just about every county fair featured wrestling matches where a touring professional would take on all comers.  Eventually, professional wrestling became the thing that it is today and lost most, if not all, of its original authenticity. 
 
    Our approach of Shingitai Jujitsu evolved from the Kodokan Judo that John Saylor excelled at as well as the American tradition of taking what we know and making it work for us.  We believe our emphasis of the three principles that make up Shingitai make it a comprehensive approach to not only grappling, but also to personal combat.  As John Saylor has said often; “Jujitsu is first and foremost a fighting art.”  The principles of Shin (fighting heart or spirit), Gi (a practical emphasis on technical skill) and Tai (physical fitness) are the principles of any good martial artist, grappler or fighter.  While no approach to martial arts training can be complete, our goal in Shingitai is to offer the most practical, effective and technically sound education possible to anyone who chooses to embrace it. 
 
 
SHINGITAI AS YOUR BASIS FOR TRAINING ON THE MAT
 
     We firmly believe that Shingitai Jujtisu is the type of approach to martial arts that  can be someone’s base as a serious martial arts athlete or student.  Like the Russians  embraced sambo, the open-ended approach to accepting anything that works is a characteristic of Shingitai Jujitsu.  It’s a large and solid enough base that you can take the principles and skills of SJJ and use them in any form of fighting or self-defense you wish.  If there is any phrase to describe what SJJ is, it’s “open-ended.”  This means that we emphazise function and effectiveness and use any tool or tactic to achieve success.  Our approach is to learn the basic core technique and make it work for us.  One thing leads to another and the action-reaction-action that takes place in real fighting is our appraoch to teaching skills.  No technique is isolated; everything leads to something else, sets another move up or can be countered.  Through disciplined, austere training, an individual progresses in the Shingitai philosophy or approach to jujitsu, self-defense, grappling or martial arts. 
 
Shingitai is more than simply a "style" of jujitsu.  It's an approach to training.  The 3 elements of Shin, Gi and Tai form a functional, comprehensive and effective approach to training for anything, whether it's jujitsu, judo, sambo, submission grappling, self-defense or anything else.  
 
    Some cultures through the ages have made more emphasis than others on fighting and the Japanese tradition of personal and group combat has evolved into a variety of different fighting systems.  Jujitsu, as practiced today, offers a variety of appraoches to personal combat using hand-to-hand fighting skills as well as using weapons.  The feudal jujutsu of Japan transformed into Kodokan Judo in the late 1800s.  While some jujutsu systems remained after Prof. Jigoro Kano organized Kodokan Judo, they were minor in comparison to Kano’s judo.  Prof. Kano was a brilliant organizer, teacher, theorist and technician.  Through his work, Kodokan Judo eventually spread to every corner of the planet.  We will have more on this historical development later in this book, but suffice it to say it was Kano’s judo that laid the path for the modern forms of grappling that evolved as a result of his work.  Kodokan Judo continues to be very popular and is an Olympic sport. Millions of people practice it, but it has also been the genesis of a variety of significantly different grappling styles that were developed in the 20th Century. 
 
     In the former Soviet Union, the rough-and-tumble grappling style of sambo was developed.  Sambo’s roots are in Kodokan Judo as the founder of the Soviet grappling system studied directly under Jigoro Kano, then combined a variety of other wrestling and grappling styles from the various Soviet republics and developed sambo.  In another culture and country, Brazil, the seeds of Kodokan Judo were planted and eventually produced what has become Brazilian Jujitsu.  In our own culture here in the United States, legitimate professional wrestling was widely popular in the early 1900s.  Great wrestlers such as Frank Gotch, Farmer Burns and others  popularized what became known as Catch-as-Catch-Can wrestling.  Before there was professional football, baseball and basketball, the sport of professional wrestling attracted thousands of spectators all across the country.  Just about every county fair featured wrestling matches where a touring professional would take on all comers.  Eventually, professional wrestling became the thing that it is today and lost most, if not all, of its original authenticity. 
 
    Our approach of Shingitai Jujitsu evolved from the Kodokan Judo that John Saylor excelled at as well as the American tradition of taking what we know and making it work for us.  We believe our emphasis of the three principles that make up Shingitai make it a comprehensive approach to not only grappling, but also to personal combat.  As John Saylor has said often; “Jujitsu is first and foremost a fighting art.”  The principles of Shin (fighting heart or spirit), Gi (a practical emphasis on technical skill) and Tai (physical fitness) are the principles of any good martial artist, grappler or fighter.  While no approach to martial arts training can be complete, our goal in Shingitai is to offer the most practical, effective and technically sound education possible to anyone who chooses to embrace it. 
 
 
Shingitai Jujitsu: A Culture Of Discipline 
 
By John Saylor 
    The modern Western culture in which we live values comfort, instant gratification, and ease. Just look at all the advertising claiming easy weight loss, or fitness without effort. The “want something for nothing” philosophy is everywhere around us. In Shingitai Jujitsu, though, we have different values that we maintain within a culture of discipline. We exercise this discipline in the following three categories: 
 
Shin: means mind, spirit, or heart. 
 
Gi: refers to technique or skill. 
 
Tai: means the body, or the physical. 
 
  If you possess discipline in each of these areas you will set yourself apart from the milk-suck, weak-willed majority around you. You will prevail in jujitsu and in life. 
 
  The philosophy of Shingitai was something I first learned from my coach, Yoshisada “Yone” Yonezuka, a 2-time U.S. Olympic Judo Coach and All-Japan Collegiate Champion. As Yone explained, if you possess these attributes in the right proportion you will most often emerge the winner in judo or other martial arts. The Japanese often combine these three words into one: Shingitai, and it’s no accident that Shin is always first. You must first have the right mind-set before you will acquire great skill or physical conditioning. The qualities of Shin, Gi, and Tai are closely interwoven and each has an influence on the others. Keep these things in mind as you train in Shingitai Jujitsu. 
 
 
SHINGITAI JUJITSU SKILL SYLLABUS AND RANK REQUIREMENTS
 
SCROLL DOWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE.
Presented at the bottom of this page is the technical syllabus and minimum rank requirements used by Welcome Mat for Shingitai Jujitsu. All jujitsu rank earned at Welcome Mat is issued by the Shingitai Jujitsu Association.
SHINGITAI JUJITSU ASSOCIATION
SYLLABUS FOR JUJITSU RANK
Presented here is the technical syllabus and minimum rank standards used by Welcome Mat for Shingitai Jujitsu.  All rank is jujitsu earned at Welcome Mat is issued by the Shingitai Jujitsu Association.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
    The purpose of this syllabus is to provide a fundamentally sound basis of passing knowledge, skill and ability in Shingitai Jujitsu to anyone who wishes to learn.  The color of one’s belt or accumulation of dan grades is of less importance than the skill one possesses. Ability is more important than belt rank, but belt rank is a useful tool as a method of external motivation in learning. This syllabus can also serve as an organized plan of teaching technical skills in judo. 
 
RANK LEVELS
    The Shingitai Jujitsu Association  (SJA) uses the following system for rank promotions in jujitsu.
 
RankNameBelt (16-older)     Belt (15-under)
 
Mudansha (Ungraded)
7 Class  Shichikyu White White
6 Class  Rokkyu   Yellow Yellow
5 Class Gokyu   Green Orange
4 Class Yonkyu   Blue  Green
3 Class Sankyu   Brown*      Blue
2 Class Nikyu    Brown Purple
1 Class  Ikkyu             Brown Brown
 
*Exceptional judoka may be promoted to Senior Sankyu at the minimum age of 14 years old or a freshman in high school.
 
Yudansha (Graded)
1 Grade ShodanBlack Minimum age for Shodan is 16 years old.
2 Grade  Nidan    BlackMinimum age for Nidan is 18 years old.
3 Grade Sandan BlackMinimum age for Sandan is 21 years old.
4 GradeYondan BlackMinimum age for Yondan is 26 years old.
5 Grade Godan  BlackMinimum age for Godan is 35 years old.
 
RANK PROMOTION AUTHORITY
    Generally, a coach or instructor must be a minimum of two (2) ranks higher than the rank to which he is promoting a student.  In all cases, a coach or instructor must be a minimum rank of Shodan to promote students. Brown belts are not permitted to promote students. 
Coach’s Rank     Authority to Promote
ShodanNikyu
Nidan  Ikkyu
SandanShodan
YondanNidan (For applicants of Nidan or above, the applicant must attend the SJA National Training Camp in Ohio.)
GodanSandan (For applicants of Nidan or above, the applicant must attend the SJA National Training Camp in Ohio.)
     Jujitsuka seeking ranks of Yondan or higher are required to apply to the SJA Headquarters for approval.
 
TIME IN GRADE AND SKIP PROMOTIONS
    TIME IN GRADE: Time in grade refers to the active time a jujitsuka spends at a specific rank level. Being away from jujitsu does not count as time in grade.  An example is if someone earns his Shodan, and then stops practicing or even being involved with Shingitai Jujitsu, this person is not active and the time he is away from active participation in jujitsu or jujitsu activities does not count toward “time in grade” for his next promotion.  If a person can’t physically practice jujitsu for some reason, but stays involved as an active supporter, then he is considered active.
    Time in grade is important for the development of the jujitsuka.  It takes time and a lot of hard work during that time to mature, gain confidence and develop the technical ability to progress on to the next rank level.
    SKIP PROMOTIONS:  A “skip promotion” takes place when a jujitsuka passes over of skips one or more ranks.  In other words, being promoted from Shodan to Sandan and skipping Nidan or being promoted from Nikyu to Shodan and skipping over Ikkyu.  Under no circumstances will skip promotions be allowed or used.
 
 
 
ROKKYU (6th Class Yellow Belt)
Purpose of Rank:  Introduce student to the fundamental skills and theories of Shingitai Jujitsu.
There are three (3) elements required for promotions. They are; (1) Demonstrate functional technical skill. (2) Time-In-Grade. (3) Active participation on the mat as a student of judo.
 
GENERAL
MEMBER OF THE SHINGITAI JUJITSU ASSOCIATION.
EXCELLENT CLASS ATTENDANCE.
GOOD WORKING KNOWLEDGE OF THE JAPANESE TERMINOLOGY USED IN JUJITSU.
BASIC KNOWLEDGE OF THE HISTORY OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE FROM WHITE BELT TO YELLOW BELT IS 4 TO 6 MONTHS.
PERFORM ALL SKILLS ON A LEVEL OF AT LEAST A “7” BASED ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10.
 
GENERAL SKILLS
GOOD ABILITY AT GRIP FIGHTING.
UNDERSTANDS AND USES GOOD POSTURE AND FOOTWORK.
ACTIVELY PARTICIPATES IN RANDORI. 
GOOD ABILITY AT HIP BLOCKS AND DEFENSES AGAINST THROWS.
DEMONSTRATE FUNCTIONAL ABILITY AT ALL UKEMI (BREAKFALLS).
DEMONSTRATE BASIC SKILL AT UCHIKOMI.
 
NAGE WAZA-THROWING TECHNIQUES
O SOTO GARI-MAJOR OUTER REAP
KOSHI GURUMA-HIP WHEEL
OGOSHI-MAJOR HIP THROW
IPPON SEOI NAGE-I ARM SHOLDER THROW
 
KANSETSU WAZA-JOINT (ARMLOCK) TECHNIQUES
SPINNING JUJI GATAME
DEMONSTRATE ANY THROW AND FOLLOW THROUGH TO JUJI GATAME.
DEMONSTRATE ONE ARM LOVER FOR JUJI GATAME.
DEMONSTRATE STEAL ARM/SHOLDER DEFENSE AGAINST JUJI GATAME.
 
KANSETSU WAZA-JOINT (LEGLOCK) TECHNIQUES
1-STRAIGHT ANKLE LOCK
  A-USING SQUARE GRIP B-USING FIGURE FOUR GRIP C-USING LAPEL GRIP
2-DEMONSTRATE THE GATOR ROLL TO SECURE THE STRAIGHT ANKLE LOCK.
3-DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST (2) DEFENSES AGAINST THE STRAIGHT ANKLE LOCK (APPLICANT’S CHOICE).
 
OSAEKOMI WAZA-HOLDING TECHNIQUES
MUNE GATAME-CHEST HOLD
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST ONE BREAKDOWN TO MUNE GATAME.
DEMONSTRATE ANY THROW AND FOLLOW THROUGH TO MUNE GATAME.
DEMONSTATE SHRIMP ESCAPE AGAINST MUNE GATAME.
KESA GATAME-SCARF HOLD
DEMOSNTATE AT LEAST ONE BREAKDOWN TO KESA GATAME.
DEMONSTRATE ANY THROW AND FOLLOW THROUGH TO KESA GATAME.
DEMONSTRATE BRIDGE AND ROLL ESCAPE AGAINST KESA GATAME.
 
SHIME WAZA-STRANGLING TECHNIQUES
HADAK JIME (SQUARE GRIP)-NAKED CHOKE
HADAKA JIME (FIGURE FOUR GRIP)
FRONT HADAKA JIME (GUILLOTINE)
 
DEMONSTRATE TWO (2) GUARD PASSES AND TWO (2) GUARD SWEEPS.
DEMONSTATE A GOOD UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONCEPT OF POSITION AND DEMOSNTATE HOW TO CONTROL OPPONENT BEFORE APPLYING A BREAKDOWN OR APPLICATION FOR OSAEKOMI, SHIME WAZA OR KANSETSU WAZA.
 
ADDITIONAL
Applicant must know the following basic Japanese terminology:
DOJO-TRAINING HALL
SENSEI-TEACHER OR COACH
TATAMI-MAT
UKEMI-BREAKFALLS
JUDOGI/JUJITSUGI-JUDO OR JUJITSU UNIFORM
RANDORI-FREE PRACTICE
 
GOKYU (5th Class Green Belt)
Purpose of Rank:  Functional skill and technical theory of Shingitai Jujitsu is the purpose of this rank. The student will broaden his or her skill and technical ability as well as understanding of why and how jujitsu works.
There are three (3) elements required for promotions. They are; (1) Demonstrate functional technical skill. (2) Time-In-Grade. (3) Active participation on the mat as a student of jujitsu.
 
GENERAL
MEMBER OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU ASSOCIATION.
EXCELLENT CLASS ATTENDANCE.
GOOD WORKING KNOWLEDGE OF THE JAPANESE TERMINOLOGY USED IN JUJITSU.
BASIC KNOWLEDGE OF THE HISTORY OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE FROM WHITE BELT TO GREEN BELT IS 6 MONTHS.
PERFORM ALL SKILLS ON A LEVEL OF AT LEAST A “7” BASED ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10.
 
GENERAL SKILLS
GOOD ABILITY AT GRIP FIGHTING.
UNDERSTANDS AND USES GOOD POSTURE AND FOOTWORK.
ACTIVELY PARTICIPATES IN RANDORI. 
GOOD ABILITY AT HIP BLOCKS AND DEFENSES AGAINST THROWS.
DEMONSTRATE FUNCTIONAL ABILITY AT ALL UKEMI (BREAKFALLS).
DEMONSTRATE IMPROVED SKILL AT UCHIKOMI.
DEMENOSTATE A BASIC SKILL LEVEL AT BUTSUKARI.
KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UCHI KOMI AND BUTSUKARI.
DEMONSTRATE BASIC SKILL AT FOOTWORK AND BODY MOVEMENT.
DEMONSTRATE A BASIC LEVEL OF SKILL THE HIP BLOCK AND CUT-AWAY DEFENSE AGASINT A THROW.
 
NAGE WAZA-THROWING TECHNIQUES
DE ASHI BARAI-ADVANCING FOOT SWEEP
ASHI DORI-SINGLE LEG GRAB
TSURI GOSHI-LIFTING HIP THROW
O UCHI GARI-MAJOR INNER REAP
MOROTE SEOI NAGE-BOTH HANDS SHOULDER THROW
ERI SEOI NAGE-LAPEL SHOULDER THROW
KNEE DROP SEOI NAGE-KNEE DROP SHOULDER THROW
TAI OTOSHI-BODY DROP
MOROTE GARI-BOTH HANDS REAP
 
KANSETSU WAZA-JOINT (ARMLOCK) TECHNIQUES
BACK ROLL JUJI GATAME
HIP ROLL JUJI GATAME
HEAD ROLL JUJI GATAME
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST TWO (2) LEVERS TO APPLY JUJI GATAME.
BASIC APPLICATION OF UDE GARAMI (UPWARD DIRECTION)
BASIC APPLICATION OF UDE GARAMI (DOWNWARD DIRECTION)
 
OSAEKOMI WAZA-HOLDING TECHNIQUES
YOKO SHIHO GATAME-SIDE FOUR CORNER HOLD
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST ONE BREAKDOWN TO YOKO SHIHO GATAME.
DEMOSTRATE SHRIMP ESCAPE AGAINST YOKO SHIHO GATAME
KATA GATAME-SHOULDER HOLD
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST ONE BREAKDOWN TO KATA GATAME
DEMONSTRATE TRANSITION FROM KATA GATAME TO KATA JIME.
 
SHIME WAZA-STRANGLING TECHNIQUES
DEMONSTATE THE FOLLOWING SHIME WAZA FROM THE BASIC POSITON AND AT LEAST ONE ROLL, BREAKDOWN OR SET-UP IN A FUNCTIONAL APPLICATION
KATA JIME-SHOULDER CHOKE
JUJI JIME-CROSS STRANGLE (NAMI, KATA AND GYAKU VARITATONS) FROM BOTH THE BOTTOM POSITON AND TOP POSITION
OKURI ERI JIME-SLIDING LAPEL STRANGLE (BASIC APPLICATION)
ROLLING OKURI ERI JIME
KATA ERI JIME-SINGLE WING STRANGLE (BASIC APPLICATION)
ROLLING KATA HA JIME
 
 
DEMONSTRATE FOUR (4) GUARD PASSES AND FOUR (4) GUARD SWEEPS.
DEMONSTATE A GOOD UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONCEPT OF POSITION AND DEMOSNTATE HOW TO CONTROL OPPONENT BEFORE APPLYING A BREAKDOWN OR APPLICATION FOR OSAEKOMI, SHIME WAZA OR KANSETSU WAZA
 
ADDITIONAL
Applicant must know the following basic Japanese terminology:
HAJIME-START OR BEGIN
MATE-STOP OR BREAK IN THE ACTION
KUMI KATA-NATURAL OR BASIC GRIP
UCHIKOMI-REPETITIVE PRACTICE
SHIAI-TOURNAMENT OR CONTEST
KIYOSUKE-“ATTENTION” CALLED BY COACH OR SENIOR STUDENT
REI-BOW
IPPON-FULL POINT IN A JUDO MATCH
WAZA-ARI-ALMOST A FULL POINT IN A JUDO MATCH
YUKO-ALMOST A WAZA-ARI IN A JUDO MATCH
 
 
 
 
YONKYU (4th Class Blue Belt)
Purpose of Rank:  Yonkyu is a time when the student prepares for the brown belt level of expertise and the emphasis is one a further development of technical and theoretical understanding of Shingitai Jujitsu as well as the ethical standards of Shingitai Jujitsu
There are three (3) elements required for promotions. They are; (1) Demonstrate functional technical skill. (2) Time-In-Grade. (3) Active participation on the mat as a student of judo.
 
GENERAL
DEMONSTRATE IMPROVED SKILL AT BUTUSUKARI.
KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UCHIKOMI AND BUTSUKARI.
DEMONSTRATE:
KUZUSHI-UNBALANCING OF OPPONENT (WITH EMPHASIS ON GOOD MOVEMENT)
TSUKURI-FITTING INTO THE TECHNIQUE
KAKE-EXECUTIN OF THROW
KIME-FOLLOW THROUGH
 
NAGE WAZA-THROWING TECHNIQUES
TSURIKOMI GOSHI-LIFTING PULLING HIP THROW
UCHI MATA-INNER THIGH THROW
HARAI GOSHISWEEPING HIP THROW
KO UCHI GAKE-MINOR INNER HOOK
KATA GURUMA-SHOULDER WHEEL
URA NAGE-REAR THROW
 
KANSETSU WAZA/JOINT (ARMLOCK) TECHNIQUES
UDE GARAMI FROM THE BOTTOM
UDE GARAMI AS A FOLLOW THROUGH FROM A THROWING TECHNIQUE
DEMONSTRATE UDE GARAMI FROM APPLICANT’S CHOICE OF POSITION.
 
OSAEKOMI WAZA-HOLDING TECHNIQUES
KAMI SHIHO GATAME-UPPER FOUR-CORNER HOLD
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST ONE BREAKDOWN TO KAMI SHIHO GATAME
DEMONSTRATE ESCAPE FROM KAMI SHIHO GATAME.
DEMONSTRATE KAMI SHIHO GATAME TO AN ARMLOCK OF APPLICANT’S CHOICE.
TATE SHIHO GATAME-VERTICAL FOUR-CORNER HOLD
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST ONE BREAKDOWN TO TATE SHIHO GATAME
DEMONSTRATE ESCAPE ONE BREAKDOWN FROM TATE SHIHO GATAME
DEMONSTRATE TATE SHIHO GATAME TO AN ARMLOCK OF APPLICANT’S CHOICE
 
SHIME WAZA-STRANGLING TECHNIQUES
WANA JIME-TRAP CHOKE
KARAMI JIME-WRAPPING CHOKE (ALSO KNOWN AS THE “GLAHN SPECIAL”)
SANKAKU JIME-TRIANGLE CHOKE FROM BOTTOM (GUARD) POSITION
JIGOKU JIME-HELL STRANGLE
 
DEMONSTRATE FOUR (4) GUARD PASSES AND FOUR (4) GUARD SWEEPS.
DEMONSTATE A GOOD UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONCEPT OF POSITION AND DEMOSNTATE HOW TO CONTROL OPPONENT BEFORE APPLYING A BREAKDOWN OR APPLICATION FOR OSAEKOMI, SHIME WAZA OR KANSETSU WAZA
 
ADDITIONAL
 
Applicant must know the following basic Japanese terminology:
SHINGITAI JUJITSU-SHIN TRANSLATES TO "FIGHTING HEART," GI TRANSLATES TO MEAN "TECHNICAL SKILL" AND TAI IMPLIES "PHYSICAL FITNESS."  JUJITSU IMPLIES FUNCTIONAL OR ADAPTABLE TECHNIQUE, SKILL OR ART. THE WORD “JUJITSU” IS ALSO OFTEN TRANSLATED TO MEAN “GENTLE ART.”
NEWAZA-GENERAL TERM FOR GRAPPLING TECHNIQUES
BUTSUKARI-ANOTHER NAME FOR UCHIKOMI, BUT THE EMPHASIS IS ON FOOT SPEED
KUZUSHI-UNBALANCING AND CONTROLLING THE BALANCE OF AN OPPONENT
TSUKURI-FITTING INTO A TECHNIQUE
KAKE-EXECUTION OF TECHNIQUE
KIME-THE FOLLOW THROUGH OR FINISH TO THE TECHNIQUE
OBI-BELT
UWAGI-JACKET
ZUBON-PANTS
 
 ADVANCED YONKYU (4th class Blue Belt)
This rank is a continuation of Yonkyu with the primary purpose of preparing the student fo rthe rank of Sankyu. A minimum of one (1) year time in grade is required since the student's initial promotion to Yonkyu. The applicant must demonstrate a more advanced level of skill on all Yonkyu requirements, performing all skills on a level of 8 or 9 on a scale with 10 being the best.
 
 
SANKYU (3rd Class Brown Belt) SYLLABUS   
NIKYU (2nd Class Brown Belt) SYLLABUS
IKKYU (1st Class Brown Belt) SYLLABUS
 
Purpose of Rank for All Brown Belts:  The purpose of the brown belt ranks is to prepare the student for the rank of Shodan. Students wearing a brown belt are no longer novices and are at an intermediate level. The brown belt ranks place a strong emphasis on technical excellence in all phases of fundamental skill development. Also, a broader understanding and appreciation on the philosophy, history and use of terminology in Shingitai Jujitsu is emphasized in the brown belt ranks.
There are three (3) elements required for promotions. They are; (1) Demonstrate functional technical skill. (2) Time-In-Grade. (3) Active as a competitive athlete, or active physically and has excellent attendance at workouts and classes.
 
TIME IN GRADE
MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE FROM YONKYU (BLUE BELT) TO SANKYU IS ONE (1) YEAR.
MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE FROM SANKYU TO NIKYU IS ONE (1) ADDITIONAL YEAR.
MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE FROM NIKYU TO IKKYU IS ONE (1) ADDITIONAL YEAR.
(Applicant will serve as a Sankyu for one year at the minimum. After his/her promotion to Nikyu, he will serve another year (at the minimum) at this rank. Upon his promotion to Ikkyu, he will serve a minimum of one additional year before he is eligible for promotion to Shodan.)
 
GENERAL
MINIMUM AGE FOR SANKYU OF 14 YEARS OLD OR FRESHMAN IN HIGH SCHOOL
MINIMUM AGE FOR NIKYU IS 15 YEARS OLD
MINIMUM AGE FOR IKKYU IS 15 YEARS OLD
ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE SHINGITAI JUJITSU ASSOCIATION        
EXCELLENT CLASS ATTENDANCE
ASSIST WITH NEW STUDENTS TAKING AN ACTIVE ROLE IS ASSISTING THE HEAD COACH WITH TEACHING NEW STUDENTS.
GOOD WORKING KNOWLEDGE OF THE JAPANESE TERMINOLOGY USED IN JUJITSU. 
BASIC KNOWLEDGE OF THE HISTORY OF WELCOME MAT, SHINGITAI JUJITSU AND JUJITSU IN GENERAL.
PROMOTION TIME IN GRADE
MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE FROM YONKYU TO SANKYU IS ONE (1) YEAR.
MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE FROM SANKYU TO NIKYU IS ONE (1) YEAR.
MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE FROM NIKYU TO IKKYU IS ONE (1) YEAR.
PERFORM ALL SKILLS ON A LEVEL OF AT LEAST “7” BASED ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 FOR SANKYU.
PERFORM ALL SKILLS ON A LEVEL OF AT LEAST  “8” BASED ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 FOR NIKYU.
PERFORM ALL SKILLS ON A LEVEL OF AT LEAST “10” BASED ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 FOR IKKYU. 
 
GENERAL SKILLS
VERY GOOD ABILITY AT GRIP FIGHTING
UNDERSTANDS AND USES GOOD POSTURE AND FOOTWORK.
ACTIVELY PARTICIPATES IN RANDORI. 
GOOD ABILITY AT HIP BLOCKS AND DEFENSES AGAINST THROWS.
EXCELLENT ABILITY AT ALL UKEMI (BREAKFALLS).
DEMONSTRATE EXCELLENT SKILL AT UCHIKOMI.
DEMONSTRATE EXCELLENT SKILL AT BUTUSUKARI.
KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UCHIKOMI AND BUTSUKARI.
 
 
 
NAGE WAZA (THROWING TECHNIQUES)
O SOTO GARI-MAJOR OUTER REAP
CROSS-BODY O SOTO GARI
TSURI GOSHI-LIFTING HIP THROW
TSURIKOMI GOSHI-LIFT PULL HIP THROW
OGOSHI-MAJOR HIP THROW
KOSHI GURUMA-HIP WHEEL
IPPON SEOI NAGE-1 ARM SHOULDER THROW
MOROTE SEOI NAGE-BOTH HAND SHOULDER THROW
KNEE DROP IPPON SEOI NAGE
KNEE DROP MOROTE SEOI NAGE
HARAI GOSHI-SWEEPING HIP THROW
UCHI MATA-INNER THIGH THROW
TAI OTOSHI-BODY DROP
OKURI ASHI BARAI-SLIDING FOOT SWEEP
ASHI DORI-SINGLE LEG GRAB
MOROTE GARI-BOTH HAND REAP
URA NAGE-REAR THROW
O UCHI GARI-MAJOR INNER REAP
KO UCHI GARI-MINOR INNER REAP
KO UCHI GAKE-MINOR INNER HOOK
TOMOE NAGE-CIRCLE THROW
 
FUSEGI-DEFENSE
HIP BLOCK (AND CUT AWAY) DEFENSE
HOP AROUND DEFENSE
SPRAWL DEFENSE
HAND BLOCK DEFENSE
 
GRIP FIGHTING
DEMONSTRATE INCREASING IMPROVED ABILITY AT GRIP FIGHTING AS STUDENT ADVANCES IN BROWN BELT RANKS.
 
RENRAKU WAZA-CONTINUATION TECHNIQUES
DEMONSTRATE A LEG ATTACK TO A FORWARD THROW
DEMONSTRATE A FORWARD ATTACK TO A LEG ATTACK
DEMONSTRATE A REAR ATTACK TO A FORWARD ATTACK
DEMONSTRATE A FORWARD ATTACK TO A REAR ATTACK
 
KAESHI WAZA–COUNTER TECHNIQUES
DEMONSTRATE A COUNTER TO A FORWARD ATTACK
DEMONSTRATE A COUNTER TO A REAR ATTACK
 
TRANSITION FROM THROW TO GROUNDFIGHTING
DEMONSTRATE THROW TO PIN
DEMONSTRATE THROW TO ARMLOCK
 
OSAEKOMI WAZA (HOLDING OR IMMOBILIZATION TECHNIQUES)
MUNE GATAME-CHEST HOLD (AND 1 VARIATION)
YOKO SHIHO GATAME-SIDE 4-CORNER HOLD (AND 1 VARIATION)
KAMI SHIHO GATAME-UPPER 4-CORNER HOLD (AND 1 VARIATION)
TATE SHIHO GATAME-VERTICAL 4-CORNER HOLD (AND 1 VARIATION)
KESA GATAME-SCARF HOLD (AND 1 VARIATION)
KATA GATAME-SHOULDER HOLD (AND 1 VARIATION)
 
BREAKDOWN TO OSAEKOMI WAZA
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST ONE (1) EFFECTIVE BREAKDOWN PUTTING UKE ON HIS BACK FOR EACH OSAEKOMI WAZA LISTED ABOVE.
 
GUARD PASS TO OSAEKOMI WAZA
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST ONE (1) GUARD PASS LEADING TO A PIN FOR EACH OSAEKOMI WAZA LISTED.
 
GUARD ROLLOVER OR SWEEP TO OSAEKOMI WAZA
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST ONE (1) ROLLOVER OR SWEEP FROM THE BOTTOM GUARD POSITION FOR EACH OSAEKOMI WAZA LISTED.
 
NOGARE KATA-ESCAPE TECHNIQUES
SHRIMP AND PULL OPPONENT TO GUARD ESCAPE
BRIDGE AND ROLL ESCAPE
LEG SCISSORS ESCAPE
KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ‘ACTIVE ESCAPE” AND A “PASSIVE ESCAPE”
 
POSITION AND CONTROL
DEMONSTRATE THE “WRESTLER’S RIDE”
DEMONSTRATE THE RODEO RIDE AND FLATTEN OPPONENT
DEMONSTRATE THE RODEO RIDE AND ROLL OPPONENT
DEMONSTRATE A “GO BEHIND” AND ESTABLISH A RIDE
 
BREAKDOWNS
FAR ARM-NEAR LEG
BOTH ELBOWS BREAKDOWN
BOTH KNEES BREAKDOWN
BELT AND NELSON (OPPONENT ON ALL FOURS)
BELT AND NELSON (OPPONENT FLAT)
JUDO STACK (OPPONENT FLAT)
JUDO STACK (OPPONENT ON ALL FOURS)
JUDO SWITCH (FROM BOTTOM TO TOP POSITION)
PETERSON ROLL
SODEN ROLL
BURNS BREAKDOWN
 
KANSETSU WAZA (JOINT LOCKING TECHNIQUES)
There are four (4) Primary Armlocks. They are; 1-Udehishigi Juji Gatame (commonly called Juji Gatame)-the Cross-body Armlock, 2-Ude Garami-Arm Entanglement (commonly called the Bent Armlock), 3-Waki Gatame-the Armpit Lock, and 4-Ude Gatame-Arm Lock (commonly called the Straight Armlock). The two (2) most common armlocks (Juji gatame and Ude Garami) will be emphasized for Sankyu. As the student advances to Nikyu and Ikkyu, he will be expected to learn the other 2 primary armlocks of Waki Gatame and Ude Gatame.
 
JUJI GATAME-CROSS BODY ARMLOCK
SPINNING JUJI GATAME
BACK ROLL JUJI GATAME (DEMONSTRATE AS THE “SPIN AND STRETCH)
HIP ROLL JUJI GATAME
HEAD ROLL JUJI GATAME
 
LEG PRESS POSITION
DEMONSTRATE THE LEG PRESS POSITION WITH EXCELLENT SKILL
DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST TWO (2) LEVERS TO PRY OPPONENT’S ARM FREE FOR JUJI GATAME FROM THE LEG PRESS POSITION.
DEFENSE FOR JUJI GATAME-DEMONSTRATE GRABBING ARMS DEFENSE WHEN ON THE BOTTOM IN THE LEG PRESS POSTION.
DEFENSE FOR JUJI GATAME-DEMONSTRATE “STEAL YOUR SHOULDER” DEFENSE WHEN ON THE BOTTOM IN THE LEG PRESS POSITION.
DEMONSTRATE FROM THE LEG PRESS POSITON-JUJI GATAME TO A PIN OF YOUR CHOICE.
 
TRANSITIONS
TRANSITION FROM OSAEKOMI WAZA TO KANSETSU WAZA
DEMONSTRATE A PIN TO AN ARMLOCK TRANSITION
DEMONSTRATE AN ARMLOCK TO A PIN TRANSITION
DEMONSTRATE A TRANSITION (STUDENT’S CHOICE) FROM ONE ARMLOCK TO ANOTHER ARMLOCK (EXAMPLE-JUJI GATAME TO ANOTHER JUJI GATAME OR UDE GARAMI TO JUJI GATAME).
DEMONSTRATE “DOUBLE TROUBLE” WITH OMOTE (FRONT) SANKAKU JIME AND JUJI GATAME FROM THE BOTTOM GUARD POSITION
 
UDE GARAMI-ARM ENTANGLEMENT
DEMONSTRATE BASIC UPWARD POSITION FROM A PIN
DEMONSTRATE BASIC DOWNWARD POSITON FROM A PIN
DEMONSTRATE UDE GARAMI FROM THE BOTTOM (GUARD) POSITION
DEMONSTRATE TRANSITON FROM UDE GARAMI TO JUJI GATAME
DEMONSTRATE UDE GARAMI WHEN OPPONENT IS FLAT ON HIS FRONT (DEMONSTRATE FIGURE FOUR CONTROL OF OPPONENT’S ARM AND SECURE THE ARMLOCK)
DEMONSTRATE UDE GARAMI WHEN YOU HAVE OPPONENT IS SIDE SANKAKU POSITION (DOUBLE TROUBLE)
 
The following are required for Nikyu.
WAKI GATAME-ARMPIT LOCK (BASIC APPLICATION) FROM A WRESTLER’S RIDE OR BEHIND UKE.
WAKI GATAME FROM THE TOP POSITION
ROLLING ESCAPE FROM WAKI GATAME.
 
 
The following are required for Ikkyu.
UDE GATAME-STRAIGHT ARMLOCK (BASIC APPLICATION WITH BOTH HANDS ON UKE’S ELBOW)
UDE GATAME-STRAIGHT ARMLOCK (BASIC APPLICATION WITH FIGURE FOUR HOLD ON UKE’S ELBOW)
 
 
RENRAKU WAZA-COMBINATION TECHNIQUES
DEMOSNTRATE KESA GATAME TO UDE GARAMI
DEMONSTRATE TATE SHIHO GATAME TO UDE GARAMI
 
FUSEGI-DEFENSE
DEMONSTRATE GRABBING YOUR BELT DEFENSE FOR UDE GARAMI.
DEMONSTRATE “HEAD WEDGE” DEFENSE FOR UDE GARAMI
 
SHIME WAZA (STRANGLING OR CONTRICTION TECHNIQUES)
HADAKA JIME-NAKED CHOKE (SQUARE GRIP) FLATTEN OPPONENT AND APPLY STRANGLE
HADAKA JIME-NAKED CHOKE (SQUARE GRIP) ROLL OPPONENT AND APPLY STRANGLE
HADAK JIME-NAKE CHOKE (FIGURE FOUR GRIP) FLATTEN OPPONENT AND APPLY STRANGLE
HADAKA JIME-NAKED CHOKE (FIGURE FOUR GRIP) ROLL OPPONENT AND APPLY STRANGLE
URA HADAKA JIME-NAKED CHOKE FROM TOP (GUILLOTINE) POSITION
JUJI JIME-CROSS STRANGLE (FROM TOP)
JUJI JIME-CROSS STRANGLE (FROM BOTTOM)
WANA JIME-TRAP CHOKE
OKURI ERI JIME-SLIDING LAPEL STRANGLE (DEMONSTRATE BASIC APPLICATION)
OKURI ERI JIME-SLIDING LAPEL STRANGE (ROLL OPPONENT AND APPLY STRANGLE)
KATA HA JIME-SINGLE WING STRANGLE (DEMONSTRATE BASIC APPLICATION)
1-DEMONSTRATE “SLICING” WITH YOUR ARM AGAINST THE BACK OF OPPONENT’S HEAD AND NECK
2-DEMONSTRATE TRAPPING AND EXTENDING OPPONENT’S ARM
3-DEMONSTRATE THE “NEAR WRIST” CONTROL AND APPLY KATA HA JIME
KATA HA JIME-SINGLE WING STRANGLE (ROLL OPPONENT AND APPLY STRANGLE)
KARAMI JIME-ENTANGLING STRANGLE (“GLAHN SPECIAL”) WHEN OPPONENT IS ON ALL FOURS
KARAMI JIME-ENTANGLING STRANGLE (“GLAHN SPECIAL”) WHEN OPPONENT IS FLAT ON FRONT
KATA JIME-SHOULDER STRANGLE
SANKAKU JIME (OMOTE) FRONT TRIANGLE STRANGLE (FROM THE BOTTOM GUARD POSITION)
SANKAKU JIME (YOKO) SIDE TRIANGLE STRANGLE
 
RENRAKU WAZA-COMBINATIONS
DEMONSTRATE JUJI JIME FROM THE FRONT BOTTOM GUARD POSITION TO JUJI GATAME
DEMONSTRATE OKURI ERI JIME TO JUJI GATAME WHEN YOU ARE BEHIND OPPONENT IN THE SEATED RODEO RIDE
DEMONSTRATE YOKO SANKAKU JIME TO UDE GARAMI (DOUBLE TROUBLE)
DEMONSTRATE OMOTE SANKAKU JIME AND JUJI GATAME FROM THE BOTTOM GUARD POSITION (DOUBLE TROUBLE)
 
FUSEGI-DEFENSE
DEMONSTRATE TUCKING CHIN DEFENSE
DEMOSNTRATE HOLDING LAPELS DEFENSE
DEMONSTRATE HAND FIGHTING AND CONTROLLING OPPONENT’S HANDS DEFENSE
DEMONSTRATE HOW TO SHUCK OPPONENT OVER YOUR HEAD IF HE HAS YOUR BACK
DEMONSTRATE A “BREAK OPEN” DEFENSE AGAINST FRONT SANKAKU JIME
DEMONSTRATE A “BREAK OPEN” DEFENSE AGAINST SIDE SANKAKU JIME
 
CONTROLLING OPPONENT FOR SHIME WAZA
DEMONSTRATE LEG CONTROL AND “LEG WRESTLING” TO CONTROL OPPONENT AND THE CONCEPT OF THE IMPORTANCE OF CONTROLLING OPPONENT’S BODY
DEMONSTRATE HOW YOUR HANDS WORK INDEPENDENTLY, YET TOGETHER TO CONTROL OPPONENT’S LAPELS, HANDS AND ARMS
 
ADDITIONAL
Applicant must know the following basic Japanese terminology:
YUDANSHA-RANKS OF BLACK BELT
MUDANSHA-RANKS BELOW BLACK BELT
 
The following consist of the 3 phases of judo training:
KATA-STRUCTURED TRAINING OR FORM
RANDORI-FREE PRACTICE
SHIAI-CONTEST
NAGE WAZA-THROWING TECHNIQUES
KATAME WAZA-GRAPPLING TECHNIQUES
ATEMI WAZA-STRIKING TECHNIQUES
OSAEKOMI WAZA-PINNING TECHNIQUES
SHIME WAZA-STRANGLING TECHNIQUES
KANSETSU WAZA-JOINT TECHNIQUES
NAGEKOMI-THROWING PRACTICE
TORI-PERSON APPLYING TECHNIQUE
UKE-PERSON HAVING TECHNIQUE APPLIED ON HIM
 
 
 
SHINGITAI SKILL SYLLABUS FOR YUDANSHA (BLACK BELT) RANKS
 
 
SHODAN (1st Grade Black Belt)
    Earning a black belt in jujitsu is similar to graduating from a good colleg eor university.  One has learned the fundamental skills and can perform them in a functional, realistic way.  This Shodan Syllabus is designed so that the person who earns the rank of Shodan has a solid foundation and can further his skills and abilities in jujitsu.  Shodan means “Initial Grade or Step” and this syllabus reflects that.  It normally takes anywhere from 4 (at a minimum) to 6 years of hard work to achieve the rank of Shodan. When earning the rank of Shodan, one is a “Yudansha” or “graded” jujitsuka and is entitled to wear the black belt. Anyone who has not achieved the rank of Shodan is considered a “Mudansha” or “ungraded” jujitsuka.  As stated before, one should consider earning the Shodan as the same as graduating from high school, and as such, it’s now time to go to college. In a judo or jujitsu sense, advancing through the black belt ranks is equivalent to advancing one’s education in a college or university. This is why it is essential that anyone that is promoted to Shodan in Shingitai Jujitsu be able to demonstrate his or her technical skills, possess a sound knowledge of the theory, history and philosophy of Shingitai Jujitsu and jujitsu in general and have the adequate time in grade as an Ikkyu.
 
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHODAN
1-APPLICANT MUST BE A MINIMUM AGE OF 16 YEARS OLD.
2-APPLICANT MUST BE AN ACTIVE MEMBER IN GOOD STANDING OF THE SHINGITAI JUJTISU ASSOCIATION.
3-APPLICANT MUST HAVE EXCELLENT ATTENDANCE IN ALL CLASSES, WORKOUTS, CLINICS AND SEMINARS IS REQUIRED.
4-APPLICANT MUST HAVE A FUNCTIONAL, WORKING KNOWLEDGE OF THE JAPANESE TERMINOLOGY USED IN JUJITSU.
5-APPLICANT MUST HAVE A WORKING, FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE OF THE HISTORY OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
6-APPLICANT MUST BE CURRENTLY CERTIFIED OR ACCREDITED IN CPR WITH A VALID, RECOGNIZED AGENCY.
7-APPLICANT MUST HAVE A MINIMUM TIME IN GRADE AS IKKYU OF ONE (1) YEAR. (THIS IS A MINIMUM-NOT STANDARD TIME IN GRADE.)
8-APPLICANT MUST ASSIST A SENIOR COACH IN TEACHING OR COACHING DUTIES.
9-APPLICANT MUST DEMONSTRATE SKILLFUL JUJITSU IN BOTH STANDING AND GROUNDFIGHTING DURING RANDORI.
10-APPLICANT MUST KNOW BOTH THE JAPANESE AND ENGLISH TERMINOLOGY FOR ALL THE TECHNIQUES HE OR SHE IS REQUIRED TO DEMONSTRATE AS WELL AS KNOW THE REQUIRED JAPANESE TERMINOLOGY AS USED IN JUJITSU AND LISTED IN THIS SYLLABUS.
 
 
IMPORTANT:  BASED ON A SCALE OF 1 (BEING THE LOWEST) UP TO AND INCLUDING 10 (BEING THE BEST), THE APPLICANT MUST DEMONSTRATE A SKILL LEVEL OF AT LEAST A “7.”  THIS IS IF THE APPLICANT IS TAKING A TEST AND BEING EXAMINED BY SENIOR COACHES FOR RANK PROMOTION, BUT IS IMPORTANT FOR THE APPLICANT TO DEMONSTRATE THIS LEVEL OF SKILL ON A REGULAR BASIS.
 
NAGE WAZA/THROWING TECHNIQUES
GOALS-EXCELLENT FUNCTIONAL SKILL AND UNDERSTANDING OF THROWING TECHNIQUES.
APPLICANT MUST DEMONSTRATE AND UNDERSTAND CONCEPT OF:
1-KUZUSHI/UNBALANCE
2-TSUKURI/FIT IN
3- KAKE/EXECUTE
4-KIME/FOLLOW-THROUGH/EFFECTIVE FINISH OR FOCUS
APPLICANT MUST HAVE A GOOD, FUNCTIONAL UNDERSTANDING AND ABILITY AT GRIP FIGHTING AND DEMONSTRATE EFFECTIVE, FUNCTIONAL AND REALISTIC GRIPPING SKILLS WHEN DEMONSTRATING THE FOLLOWING TECHNIQUES LISTED.
1-O SOTO GARI/MAJOR OUTER REAP
1A-O SOTO GARI/CROSS-BODY MAJOR OUTER REAP (ALSO CALLED O SOTO GAKE/MAJOR OUTER HOOK)
2-KOSHI GURUMA/HIP WHEEL
3-OGOSHI/MAJOR HIP THROW
3A-UKI GOSHI/FLOATING OR STRADDLING HIP THROW
4-TSURI GOSHI/PULLING HIP THROW
4A-TSURIKOMI GOSHI/LIFT-PULL HIP THROW
5-MOROTE GARI/BOTH HAND REAP
6-OKURI ASHI BARAI/SLIDING FOOT SWEEP 
6A-OKURI MOMO BARAI/SLIDING THIGH SWEEP
7-HARAI GOSHI/SWEEPING HIP THROW
8-SODE TSURIKOMI GOSHI/SLEEVE LIFT-PULL HIP THROW
9-SEOI NAGE/SHOULDER THROW
9A-IPPON SEOI NAGE (ONE ARM)
9B-MOROTE SEOI NAGE (BOTH HAND)
9C-ERI SEOI NAGE(LAPEL)
10-KNEE-DROP (SUWARI) SEOI NAGE OF APPLICANT’S CHOICE (IPPON, MOROTE OR ERI)
10A-KNEE-DROP KOSHI GURUMA
10B-KNEE DROP OGOSHI
11-UCHI MATA/INNER THIGH THROW
12-HANE GOSHI/SPRINGING HIP THROW
13-TAI OTOSHI/BODY DROP
14-O UCHI GARI/MAJOR INNER REAP
15-KO UCHI GAKE/MINOR INNER HOOK OR KO UCHI GARI/MINOR INNER REAP (APPLICANT’S CHOICE)
16-DE ASHI BARAI/ADVANCING FOOT SWEEP
17-SOTO MAKIKOMI/OUTER WINDING THROW
18-KO SOTO GAKE/MINOR OUTER HOOK
19-TANI OTOSHI/VALLEY DROP OR KO SOTO GARI/MINOR OUTER REAP (APPLICANT’ S CHOICE)
20-ASHI DORI/LEG GRAB (CUBAN LEG GRAB)
21-URA NAGE/REAR THROW
22-ASHIKUBI DORI/ANKLE PICK
23-SASAE TSURIKOMI ASHI NAGE/PROPPING DRAWING FOOT THROW
23A-HIZA GURUMA/KNEE WHEEL
23B-HARAI TSURIKOMI ASHI/SWEEPING PROPPING DRAWING ANKLE THROW
24-TE GURUMA/HAND WHEEL
15-KATA GURUMA/SHOULDER WHEEL
26-TOMOE NAGE/CIRCLE THROW
26A-YOKO TOMOE NAGE/SIDE OR SPINNING CIRCLE THROW
27-SUMI GAESHI/CORNER COUNTER THROW
 
RENRAKU WAZA/ CONTINUATION OR COMBINATION TECHNIQUES
GOAL-DEMONSTRATE A REALISTIC CONTINUATION OR COMBINATION OF ONE THROWING SKILL TO ANOTHER.
1-DEMONSTRATE A FOOT THROW TO ANY OTHER THROW.
2-DEMONSTRATE A FORWARD THROW TO ANY OTHER THROW.
3-DEMONSTRATE BLOCKING AN OPPONENT’S PUNCH, FOLLOWED BY YOUR THROWING TECHNIQUE.
4-DEMONSTRATE STOPPING AN OPPONENT’S FRONT TACKLE FOLLOWED BY YOUR SUBMISSION TECHNIQUE.
5-DEMONSTRATE BLOCKING AN OPPONENT’S FRONT KICK FOLLOWED BY ANY COUNTER OF YOUR CHOICE.
 
RENRAKU WAZA/ CONTINUATION OR COMBINATION TRANSITION FROM STANDING TO GROUNDFIGHTING TECHNIQUES
GOAL-DEMONSTRATE REALISTIC TRANSITION FROM A THROW TO GROUNDFIGHTING.
1-DEMONSTRATE ANY FORWARD THROW TO ANY OSAE WAZA.
2-DEMONSTRATE ANY FORWARD THROW TO JUJI GATAME.
3-DEMONSTRATE ANY REAR THROW OR FOOT SWEEP TO ANY OSAE WAZA.
4-DEMONSTRATE ANY REAR THROW OR FOOT SWEEP TO JUJI GATAME.
5-DEMONSTRATE APPLICANT’S FAVORITE THROW TO ANY GROUNDFIGHTING TECHNIQUE.
 
RENRAKU WAZA/CONTINUATION OR COMBINATION TECHNIQUES FROM ONE GROUNDFIGHTING SKILL TO ANOTHER GROUNDFIGHTING SKILL
GOAL-DEMONSTRATE HOW TO LINK ONE GROUNDFIGHTING SKILL TO ANOTHER, KEEPING CONTROL OF OPPONENT.
1-DEMONSTRATE MUNE GATAME TO ANY OTHER OSAE WAZA.
2-DEMONSTRATE ANY OSAE WAZA TO ANY OTHER OSAE WAZA.
3-DEMONSTRATE A REALISTIC AND FUNCTIONAL CONTINUATION OF 3 OR MORE OSAE WAZA.
4-DEMONSTRATE ANY OSAE WAZA TO ANY KANSETSU WAZA (PIN TO ARMLOCK).
4-DEMONSTRATE ANY KANSETSU WAZA TO ANY OSAE WAZA (ARMLOCK TO PIN).
5-DEMONSTRATE ANY OSAE WAZA TO ANY SHIME WAZA (PIN TO CHOKE).
6-DEMONSTRATE ANY SHIME WAZA TO ANY OSAE WAZA (CHOKE TO PIN).
7-DEMONSTRATE ANY KANSETSU WAZA TO ANY SHIME WAZA (ARMLOCK TO CHOKE).
8-DEMONSTRATE ANY SHIME WAZA TO ANY KANSETSU WAZA (CHOKE TO ARMLOCK).
9-DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST 2 DIFFERENT LEVERS TO PRY OPPONENT’ S ARM FREE TO APPLY JUJI GATAME FROM THE LEG PRESS POSITION.
 
FUSEGI/DEFENSE AND KAESHI WAZA/COUNTER TECHNIQUES
GOAL-DEMONSTRATE REALISTIC DEFENSIVE SKILLS AND COUNTER ATTACKS.
1-DEMONSTRATE HIP BLOCK AND CUT-AWAY AGAINST ANY THROW.
2-DEMONSTRATE HOP-AROUND DEFENSE AGAINST ANY THROW.
 
NOGARE KATA/ESCAPE TECHNIQUES FOR GROUNDFIGHTING
GOAL-DEMONSTRATE FUNCTIONAL AND REALISTIC ESCAPES FOR GROUNDFIGHTING.
1-DEMONSTRATE BRIDGE AND ROLL ESCAPE FROM KESA GATAME.
2-DEMONSTRATE SHRIMP ESCAPE FROM OPPONENT AT SIDE (AS IN YOKO SHIHO GATAME OR MUNE GATAME).
3-DEMONSTRATE HOW TO “STEAL” YOUR SHOULDER BACK AGAINST JUJI GATAME AND IN THE LEG PRESS.
4-DEMONSTRATE BRIDGE AND KICK-OVER ESCAPE FROM JUJI GATAME.
5-DEMONSTRATE HOW TO DEFEND YOUR NECK AGAINST ANY REAR CHOKE WITH OPPONENT USING YOUR LAPEL OR LAPELS.
6-DEMONSTRATE HOW TO DEFEND YOUR NECK AGAINST ANY REAR NAKED CHOKE.
7-DEMONSTRATE HOW TO DEFEND AGAINST ANY FRONT LAPEL CHOKE.
8-DEMONSTRATE HOW TO DEFEND AGAINST SANKAKU GATAME WHEN ATTACKER HAS YOU IN HIS GUARD.
9-DEMONSTRATE HOW TO DEFEND AGAINST SANKAKU GATAME WHEN YOU ARE ON ALL FOURS AND ATTACKER IS AT YOUR HEAD AND SHOULDERS.
 
NEWAZA/GROUNDFIGHTING POSITION, BREAKDOWNS, SET-UPS AND RIDES
GOALS-STUDENT MUST POSSESS EXCELLENT FUNCTIONAL ABILITY AT CONTROLLING OPPONENT’S POSITION AND ABLE TO USE RIDES, BREAKDOWNS AND OTHER SET UPS TO APPLY PINS OR SUBMISSION TECHNIQUES. DEMONSTRATE EXCELLENT ABILITY AT LEG WRESTLING AND HAND WRESTLING AND HOW THESE SKILLS CONTROL AN OPPONENT.  EFFECTIVE JUJITSU (IN THIS CASE, GROUNDFIGHTING) IS A SERIES OF CONTROLLING POSITIONS THAT ULTIMATELY LEADS TO DEFEATING HIM.
IMPORTANT- (WHEN DEMONSTRATING ALL BREAKDOWNS, GUARD PASSES OR GUARD SWEEPS, APPLICANT MUST IMMEDIATELY AND EFFECTIVELY MOVE INTO ANY PIN, CHOKE OR ARMLOCK OF HIS CHOICE.)
FAR ARM NEAR LEG BREAKDOWN
BELT AND NELSON BREAKDOWN (KNEES)
JUDO STACK
FRONT 2-LEG BREAKDOWN
BELT AND NELSON BREAKDOWN (FLAT)
JUDO/SAMBO SWITCH
HIP WHEEL BREAKDOWN
PETERSON ROLL
SODEN ROLL
BURNS BREAKDOWN
BOTH HAND BELT LIFT TO CHOKE WHEN UKE IS FLAT ON HIS FRONT
RODEO RIDE (FROM TOP POSITION AND SEATED RODEO RIDE)
WRESTLER’S RIDE (DEMONSTRATE HOW TO USE A RIDE TO ESTABLISH A POSITION, AND THEN MOVE TO ANOTHER CONTROL POSITION OR BREAKDOWN.)
NEAR WRIST RIDE
LEG PRESS POSITION
SPIN AND PIN
SPIN AND STRETCH (TO ARMLOCK)
 
YOU ARE IN OMOTE (GUARD) POSITION-GUARD SWEEPS OR ROLLOVERS
OMOTE (CLOSED GUARD) POSITION
KNEE PUSH ROLLOVER
ELEVATOR ROLLOVER
UNDERHOOK AND ROLLOVER
BELT LINE DEFENSE AND ROLLOVER
CROSS-GRIP/BELT GRAB ROLLOVER
SAYLOR OVERHOOK ROLLOVER
UNDERHOOK LEG AND ROLLOVER
1-ARM OVERREACH ROLLOVER
BOTTOM TO TOP ROLLOVER
BOTH KNEES PUSH FROM OMOTE
BOTH KNEES PUSH AND ROLLOVER
1-LEG TOMOE NAGE ROLLOVER
2-LEG TOMOE NAGE ROLLOVER
BOTH KNEES JAM ELEVATOR ROLLOVER
BOTH ANKLE HOOK/LEG PUSH
 
IF OPPONENT HAS YOU IN OMOTE (GUARD) POSITION-GUARD PASSES
IMPORTANT SKILL-ALWAYS STAY BELOW OPPONENT’S BELT LIKE OR HIPS UNTIL READY TO PASS.
CROSS UKE’S LEG PASS
TRAP USE’S LEG PASS
BOTH KNEES TOGETHER PASS
THROW AWAY LEGS PASS
WORK UP LEGS PASS
TRAP LEG/TRAP ANKLE PASS
BELT LIFT AND ROLLOVER PASS
SHUCK LEG PASS
BELT GRIP/CROTCH PRESSURE PASS
DEMONSTRATE HOW TO “POSTURE UP.”
 
KANSETSU WAZA/JOINT OR ARMLOCK TECHNIQUES
GOALS-ABILITY OF APPLICANT TO PERFORM ARMLOCKS IN A FUNCTIONAL WAY.  HAVE EXCELLENT SKILLS AND UNDERSTANDING OF THE ROLLS AND SET UPS FOR A VARIETY OF ARMLOCKS.  BE ABLE TO PERFORM GOOD SKILL AT ARMLOCK DEFENSES.  EXCELLENT SKILL AT LEVERS AND PRYING ARM FREE TO APPLY JUJI GATAME.
JUJI GATAME/CROSS-BODY ARMLOCK 
1-SPINNING JUJI GATAME
2-BACK ROLL JUJI GATAME
3-HIP ROLL JUJI GATAME
4-HEAD ROLL JUJI GATAME
5-DEMONSTRATE A MINIMUM OF THREE (3) OTHER BREAKDOWNS OR SET-UPS INTO JUJI GATAME.
UDE GARAMI/ARM ENTANGLEMENT (BENT ARMLOCK)
1-BASIC FROM TOP IN THE “UP” POSITION.
2-BASIC FROM TOP IN THE “DOWN” POSITION.
3-FROM THE BOTTOM (GUARD) POSITION.
WAKI GATAME/ARMPIT LOCK
1-BASIC FROM THE FRONT.
2-BASIC FROM THE WRESTLER’S RIDE (BACK).
UDE GATAME/ARM LOCK (STRAIGHT ARMLOCK)
1-DEMONSTRATE THE BASIC FIGURE-4 VARIATION.
2-DEMONSTRATE THE BASIC BOTH HANDS ON ELBOWS VARIATION.
3-DEMONSTRATE HOW TO APPLY UDE GATAME WHEN HOLDING OPPONENT IN KESA GATAME.
 
KANSETSU WAZA/JOINT OR LEGLOCK TECHNIQUES
GOALS-ABILTY OF APPLICANT TO PERFORM LEGLOCKS IN A FUNCTIONAL WAY, HAVE EXCELLENT UNDERSTANDING OF THE ROLLS AND SET UPS FOR A VARIETY OF LEGLOCKS. APPLICANT SHOULD BE ABLE TO PERFORM GOOD SKILL IN LEGLOCK DEFENSES.
1-STRAIGHT ANKLE LOCK
  A-USING SQUARE GRIP B-USING FIGURE FOUR GRIP C-USING LAPEL GRIP
2-DEMONSTRATE THE GATOR ROLL TO SECURE THE STRAIGHT ANKLE LOCK.
3-DEMONSTRATE AT LEAST (2) DEFENSES AGAINST THE STRAIGHT ANKLE LOCK (APPLICANT’S CHOICE).
4-DEMONSTRATE THE BASIC APPLICATON OF THE HEEL HOOK.
5-DEMONSTRATE THE GATOR ROLL TO SECURE THE HEEL HOOK.
6-DEMONSTRATE THE STRAIGHT LEGLOCK (KNEE BAR) FROM A GUARD PASS.
7-DEMONSTRATE THE ROLLING STRAIGHT KNE LOCK (OPPONENT IS RIDING YOU).
8-DEMONSTATE THE NEAR-LEG BENT KNEE LOCK.
9-DEMONSTRATE THE TOE HOLD (BASIC APPLICATION).
10-DEMONSTRATE GATOR ROLL TO SECURE THE TOE HOLD.
 
 
OSAEKOMI WAZA/IMMOBILIZATION (PINNING) TECHNIQUES
GOALS-HAVE FUNCTIONAL SKILL AND UNDERSTANDING OF HOW TO HOLD OPPONENT TO THE MAT. BODY POSITION, WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION AND ABILITY TO MAINTAIN A GOOD BASE ARE IMPORTANT.
1-MUNE GATAME/CHEST HOLD (AND VARIATION)
2-KESA GATAME/SCARF HOLD (AND VARIATION)
3-KATA GATAME/SHOULDER HOLD (AND VARIATION)
4-YOKOSHIHO GATAME/SIDE 4-CORNER HOLD (AND VARIATION)
5-KAMISHIHO GATAME/UPPER 4-CORNER HOLD (AND VARIATION)
6-TATESHIHO GATAME/VERTICAL 4-CORNER HOLD (AND VARIATION)
7-UKI GATAME/STRADDLE HOLD
 
 
SHIME WAZA/STRANGLING AND CHOKING TECHNIQUES AND NECK CRANKS  (*DENOTES FOR JUJITSU)
GOAL-HAVE FUNCTIONAL SKILL IN STRANGLES AND CHOKES, KNOW THE IMPORTANCE OF SAFETY WHEN USING CHOKES AND ABILITY TO USE POSITION TO SET UP THE STRANGLE OR CHOKE. 
IMPORTANT SKILLS: 1-ESTABLISH A CONTROLLING POSITION AND LOWER BODY CONTROL BEFORE CHOKING OPPONENT.
1-HADAKA JIME/NAKED CHOKE (SQUARE GRIP)
2-HADAKA JIME/FIGURE 4 VERSION NAKED STRANGLE
3-OMOTE HADAKA JIME/FRONT NAKED CHOKE (GUILLOTINE)
4-JUJI JIME/CROSS CHOKE FROM BOTTOM
5-JUJI JIME/CROSS CHOKE FROM TOP
ON THE JUJI JIME SERIES, APPLICANT MUST ALSO DEMONSTRATE THE 3 BASIC HAND POSITIONS FOR APPLYING THE STRANGLE. 1-NAMI (NORMAL) POSITION. 2-GYAKU (REVERSE) POSITION. 3-KATA (HALF AND HALF OR CROSSED) POSITION.
6-OKURI ERI JIME/SLIDING LAPEL CHOKE
7-KATA HA JIME/SINGLE WING CHOKE  (BASIC APPLICATION)
8-ROLLING KATA HA JIME (OPPONENT ON ALL FOURS)
9-KATA JIME/SHOULDER CHOKE (ARM TRIANGLE) CHOKE
10-SANKAKU JIME (OMOTE)/TRIANGLE CHOKE (FROM FRONT OFF BUTTOCKS)
11-SANKAKU JIME/TRIANGLE CHOKE (FROM TOP WITH OPPONENT ON ALL FOURS OR FLAT)
12-WANA JIME/TRAP (BASEBALL) CHOKE FROM BOTTOM OR GUARD POSITION
13-WANA JIME/TRAP CHOKE (STANDING APPLICATION)
14-JIGOKU JIME/HELL STRANGLE FROM ANY POSITION APPLICANT CHOOSES.
 
YAWARA/”SOFT” ARTS OR HAND MANIPULATION
GOALS-APPLICANT MUST DEMONSTRATE FUNCTIONAL YAWARA TECHNIQUES WITH EXCELLENT SKILL. YAWARA IS EXCELLENT FOR SELF-DEFENSE AND IS A VITAL PART OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
1-KATA TE HAZUSHI/SINGLE HAND RELEASE
2-JUJI KATA TE HAZUSHI/CROSS-BODY SINGLE HAND RELEASE
3-RYOTE HAZUSHI/2 ON 1 HAND RELEASE
4-MOROTE HAZUSHI/DOUBLE HAND RELEASE
5-YUBI TORI HAZUSHI/FINGERS GRAB RELEASE
6-TEKUBI GATAME/WRIST LOCK
7-TEKUBI NAGE/WRIST LOCK THROW
8-KOTE MAKI/WRIST BENDING (BOUNCER’S COME ALONG)
9-MOMIJI HAZUSHI/DOUBLE HAND ESCAPE FROM FRONT CHOKE
10-YUBI DORI/FINGER GRAB (RING FINGER)
 
ATEMI WAZA/STRIKING TECHNIQUES
GOALS-THE USE OF STRIKING TECHNIQUES IS NECESSARY FOR A WELL-ROUNDED APPRECIATE OF SELF-DEFENSE. SHINGITAI JUJITSU IS NOT PRIMARILY A STRIKING MARTIAL ART, BUT USES STRIKING AS A METHOD OF GETTING IN CLOSE (CLOSING THE GAP) IN SELF-DEFENSE.
1-BASIC STRAIGHT JAB
2-BASIC STRAIGHT PUNCH
3-BASIC LEFT (OR RIGHT) HOOK
4-BASIC UPPERCUT PUNCH
5-BASIC BACK KNUCKLE PUNCH
6-BASIC OIZUKI (FRONT PUNCH)
7-BASIC FRONT SNAP KICK
8-BASIC FRONT KNEE KICK
9-BASIC SIDE KICK
10-BASIC ROUNDHOUSE KICK
11-BASIC BACK KICK
12-BASIC STOMPING KICK
13-BASIC BLOCK TO FRONT PUNCH
14-BASIC BLOCK TO HOOK
15-BASIC BLOCK TO LOW KICK
16-BASIC BLOCK TO HIGH KICK
 
TERMINOLOGY, SHINGITAI THEORY AND HISTORY
Goal-Every activity has its own terminology that helps everyone understand the concepts, theories and actual application of that particular activity. Jujitsu is no different. Japanese terminology is useful in understanding the underlying and foundational concepts and theories of Shingitai Jujitsu.  Understanding the history of Shingitai Jujitsu and jujitsu in general is essential to a more complete comprehension of Shingitai Jujitsu as a method of physical education, sport, self-defense and recreational activity. One must know and appreciate the history of any activity or subject to have a good understanding of how and why that activity thrives.  Shingitai Jujitsu is no different.
 
APPLICANT MUST KNOW THE FOLLOWING TERMINOLOGY.
Important: Applicant must know both the English and Japanese names for all the techniques required for all ranks. This is especially true for the rank of Shodan.
 
SHINGITAI JUJITSU-The method or approach to training in self-defense or grappling initially developed by John Saylor in 1984 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. John Saylor initially called his method Shingitai Goshinjitsu. Goshinjitsu means “self-defense art” and John Saylor changed this to Shingitai Jujitsu in 1993. Currently, the main dojo and national headquarters of Shingitai Jujitsu is in Perrysville, Ohio at the “Barn of Truth” where John Saylor lives. The scope of Shingitai Jujitsu is to be “the decathlon of martial arts” as John Saylor has often said. Functional, realistic and technically correct skills are emphasized in Shingitai. John Saylor did not want to invent another “style” of jujitsu. Rather, Shingitai is an approach to training in the martial arts emphasizing Shin, Gi and Tai that can be applied to any martial art or combat sport.
 
SHIN-FIGHTING SPIRIT, FIGHTING HEAR, MENTAL APPLICATION AND STRATEGIC AND TACTICAL AWARNESS
THIS IS THE FIRST OF THE THREE TENETS OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
 
GI-APPLICATION OF FUNCTIONAL, REALISTIC, TECHNICALLY SOUND AND PRACTICAL SKILL  THIS IS THE SECOND OF THE THREE TENETS OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
 
TAI-PHYSICAL FITNESS, BEING IN SUPERB PHYSICAL CONDITION, “SHOWING UP IN SHAPE”  THIS IS THE THRIS OF THE THREE TENETS OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
 
KUZUSHI-CONTROLLING THE OPPONENT’S BALANCE. UNBALANCING THE OPPONENT.
 
TSUKURI-FITTING INTO THE TECHNIQUE.
 
KAKE-EXECUTING THE TECHNIQUE.
 
KIME-FOLLOWING THROUGH OR FINISHING THE TECHNIQUE WITH THE OPPONENT UNDER CONTORL.
 
KATA –STRUCTURE OR FORM. ONE OF THE 3 PRIMARY ASPECTS OF JUJITSU TRAINING.
 
RANDORI-FREE PRACTICE. ONE OF THE 3 PRIMARY ASPECTS OF JUJITSU TRAINING.
 
SHIAI-TESTING YOURSELF IN A REAL SITUATION OR COMPETITION. ONE OF THE 3 PRIMARY ASPECTS OF JUJITSU TRAINING.
 
DOJO-PRACTICE HALL OR PLACE TO TRAIN OR STUDY SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
 
TATAMI-THE MAT USED IN JUJITSU OR JUDO.
 
SENSEI-A PHRASE THAT IS USED TO DENOTE SOMEONE AS AN “HONORED TEACHER” OR “COACH.”
 
NAGE WAZA-THROWING TECHNIQUES. THE WORD “NAGE” MEANS TO “THROW OR PROJECT” AND IMPLIES THAT THE OPPONENT’S BODY IS THROWN OVER OF BY THE ATTACKER’S BODY.
 
KATAME WAZA-LOCKING TECHNIQUES. KATAME, IN THIS SENSE, MEANS TO “LOCK INTO PLACE” OR “CONTROL.” KATAME WAZA IS THE GROUNDFIGHTING OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
 
NEWAZA-A GENERIC TERM FOR ALL GROUND GRAPPLING. THE WORD “NE” REFERS TO LYING DOWN OR RECLINING, GENERALLY ON THE BACK OR BACK SIDE. WAZA MEANS “TECHNIQUE.” GROUNDFIGHTING OR GROUNDFIGHTING TECHNIQUES IN JUJITSU ARE OFTEN CALLED NEWAZA.
 
OSAEKOMI WAZA-HOLDING TECHNIQUES. OSAEKOMI MEANS TO “IMMOBILIZE” OR TO PIN OR PRESS THE OPPONENT DOWN TO THE MAT. ALSO CALLED OSAE WAZA.
 
SHIME WAZA-STRANGLING OR CHOKING TECHNIQUES. ACTUALLY, “SHIME” MEANS “TO SQUEEZE TOGETHER” AND REFERS TO THE ACTION OF SQUEEZING THE OPPONENT’S NECK, THROAT OR BODY TO DEPRIVE HIM OF OXYGEN OR ADEQAUTE BLOOD FLOW.
 
KANSETSU WAZA-JOINT TECHNIQUES (IN SHINGITAI JUJITSU, THIS REFERS TO ARMLOCKS AND LEGLOCKS.)
 
ATEMI WAZA-STRIKING TECHNIQUES
 
RENRAKU WAZA-COMBINATION OR CONTINUATION TECHNIQUES
 
KAESHI WAZA-COUNTER TECHNIQUES
 
UCHIKOMI/BUTUSKARI-REPETITIVE FITTING IN PRACTICE. THE TERM “BUTSUKARI” IS AN OLDER TERM THAT WAS USED FOR MANY YEARS THAT IS NOW CALLED UCHIKOMI. BUTSUKARI IS NOW OFTEN USED TO DENOTE THE REPETITIVE, FITTING-IN MOVEMENT WHEN PRACTICING A THROW WITH THE EMPHASIS ON FOOT PLACEMENT AND FOOT SPEED.
 
JUDOGI, JUJITSUGI OR DOGI-JUDO, JUJTISU OR MARTIAL ARTS UNIFORM. IT IS PROPER TO USE THE ENTIRE TERM “JUDOGI,” “JUJITSUGI”OR “DOGI” AND NOT SIMPLY “GI.”
 
JUJITSUKA-PERSON WHO DOES JUJITSU.
 
TORI-PERSON PERFORMING THE TECHNIQUE.
 
UKE-PERSON HAVING THE TECHNIQUE PERFORMED ON HIM.
 
UKEMI-THE METHOD OF FALLING SAFELY USED IN JUDO AND JUJITSU; OFTEN CALLED BREAKFALLS.
 
KIYOTSUKE-MEANS ‘ATTENTION” AND IS USED TO CALL STUDENTS TO ATTENTION WHEN BOWING IN OR OUT OF JUJITSU PRACTICE.
 
REI-BOW  (RITSU REI-STANDING BOW)  (ZAREI-KNEELING BOW)
 
TAISABAKI-BODY MOVEMENT OR BODY MANAGEMENT. THIS REFERS TO THE MOVEMENT OF THE BODY WHEN THE JUDOKA “LEADS WITH HIS HIPS.” HAVING AN UPRIGHT POSTURE AND USING THE HIPS TO GENERATE MOVEMENT AND POWER ARE WHAT TAISABAKI IS ABOUT.
 
SHISEI-FOOTWORK. THERE ARE SEVERAL METHODS OF FOOTWORK USED IN JUJITSU AND THIS IS THE GENERIC TERM FOR THEM.
 
YUDANSHA-PHRASE THAT REFERS TO BLACK BELTS. ACTUALLY MEANS “GRADED OR RANKED” PERSON.
 
MUDANSHA-PHRASE THAT REFERS TO ALL NON-BLACK BELTS. ACTUALLY MEANS “UNGRADED OR UNRAKED” PERSON.
 
DAN-GRADE OR STEP IN THE BLACK BELT RANKS.
 
KYU-CLASS OR DEGREE IN THE RANKS UNDER BLACK BELT.
 
THE APPLICANT MUST HAVE A GOOD KNOWLEDGE OF THE JAPANESE TERMINOLOGY FOR EACH OF THE RANKS USED IN SHINGITAI JUJITSU.
Godan-5 Grade
Yondan-4 Grade
Sandan-3 Grade
Nidan-2 Grade
Shodan-1 Grade (actually means “initial grade.”)
Ikkyu-1 Class
Nikyu-2 Class
Sankyu-3 Class
Yonkyu-4 Class
Gokyu-5 Class
Rokkyu-6 Class
Shichikyu-7 Class
 
SHINGITAI FIGHTING STRATEGY
GOALS-THE APPLICANT IS REQUIRED TO KNOW AND UNDERSATND THE BASIC FIGHTING STRATEGY OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU AS APPLICABLE TO SELF-DEFENSE. THESE STRATEGIES ENCOMPASS EFFECTIVE, FUNCTIONAL AND REALISTIC FIGHTING TACTICAL APPLICATIONS IN SELF-DEFENSE.  A TENTAT OF SHINGITAI JUJITSU IS THAT IF YOU ARE FORCED TO FIGHT, FIGHT TO WIN. APPLICANT SHOLD KNOW THE FOUR ASSUMPTINS OF SELF-DEFENSE LISTED BELOW AS WELL.
 
CLOSE THE GAP
Close the distance between you and your assailant. You must effectively do this without sustaining injury if possible. Remember that you may have to take some punishment, depending on the situation. However, it is important to get in close to be effective with a throw or takedown.  This is where the use of good body movement and position as well as your ability at striking are useful and effective.
 
TAKE OPONENT OR ASSAILANT TO THE GROUND
The effective application of throws and takedowns on your assailant is important in an effective fighting strategy. Think of a throw as a submission technique. If you throw him hard enough, that may be all that is necessary to win the fight or to make your escape. Striking is useful as well, and in some cases, the best way to get an opponent to the ground. Often, a punch or kick can set an opponent up (soften him up) so that a throw can be better used or so that you can close the gap or fighting distance between you and the assailant. Generally, most fights start standing and end on the ground.
 
IMMOBILIZE THE OPPONENT OR ASSAILANT
By controlling the action in groundfighting, you can better control or stabilize the situation and set your opponent up for the next step. Use a hold-down (Osaekomi Waza) or other submission technique to restrain the assailant to control the position. In this case, the concept of “control the position and apply the submission” comes into full play. Sometimes, but not always (depending on the situation), simply by using a restraining or immobilization technique, you can wait a short period of time for help to arrive without having to apply a finishing technique.
 
APPLY A FINISHING HOLD, SUBMISSION TECHNIQUE OR STRIKE
After getting your opponent or assailant to the ground and controlling his body movement, you can force the assailant to submit by use of a joint lock, strangle or striking technique.
 
THE FIVE ASSUMPTIONS IN SELF-DEFENSE (THESE WERE DEVLEOPED BY JOHN SAYLOR.)
1-ASSUME THE ATTACKER OR ASSAILANT IS ARMED (POSSIBLY WITH ONE OR MORE WEAPONS).
2-ASSUME THERE ARE MULTIPLE ATTCKERS, EITHER SEEN OR UNSEEN BY YOU.
3-ASSUME THE ATTACKER OR ASSAILANT KNOWS HOW TO FIGHT.
4-ASSUME THAT YOU MIGHT BE INJURED.
5-ASSUME YOU WILL HAVE TO DEFEND YOURSELF IN COURT AND GO THROUGH THE LEGAL SYSTEM.
 
BASIC HISTORY OF JUJUTSU OR JUJITSU
    What has been called jujutsu (or jujitsu) since the 1500s is the indigenous martial art of Japan and is a product of the feudal culture prevalent in Japanese history. There were hundreds of “ryu” or schools (or styles) of jujutsu practiced in Japan, each emphasizing a particular aspect or philosophy of training. When the Meji period (starting in 1868) took place, many of the feudal martial arts fell into disrepute, including the various fighting arts that comprised the generic name of jujutsu.  When Prof. Jigoro Kano founded Kodokan Judo in 1882, he incorporated many of the jujutsu schools under the umbrella of the Kodokan. Had it not been for him, jujutsu might have faded away as part of a dying feudal Japanese warrior culture.
    Prof. Jigoro Kano founded Kodokan Judo in 1882 in Tokyo, Japan. Prof. Kano studied various forms of Jujutsu (primarily Tenshin Shinyo-ryu and Kito-ryu forms of jujutsu) starting in 1877. From these sources, he developed the theories and practical application of Kodokan Judo.  Judo became an Olympic sport in 1964 for men and in 1988 for women and is practiced worldwide. 
    Kodokan Judo, as expressed by Prof. Jigoro Kano, is “The principle of the maximum-efficient use of mind and body. In studying judo, it is essential to train the body and to cultivate the mind through the methods of attack and defense. Thereby, perfecting oneself and contributing to the welfare of the world.”  Prof. Kano summarized the above by using the slogans “Maximum efficiency with minimum effort” and “Mutual welfare and benefit.” These two slogans define the two primary goals of the theory and philosophy of Kodokan Judo.
    A few jujutsu ryu, such as Daito-ryu Jujutsu, did not join the Kodokan, but many of those schools eventually died out. Daito branched off into what is now known as Aikido, and other classical jujutsu schools survive today in Japan and elsewhere but have few followers.
    Because of this, all of the modern cognate forms of jujitsu, including Shingitai Jujitsu, Russian Sambo, Brazilian Jiujitsu and the many other schools or styles of jujitsu existing today come directly, or indirectly, from Kodokan Judo. What we have, historically, is that jujutsu, the indigenous martial art of Japan, gave rise to Kodokan Judo, which eventually gave rise to many to many jujitsu styles and systems developed in the Twentieth Century.  History repeats itself in many ways, including the development of what it now called “jujitsu” in most places in the world.
    For more information, there are many good sources on this subject including the books written by Donn Draeger.
 
 
 Important: All applicants for the rank of Nidan or above must attend the National SJA Training Camp in Ohio during the same calendar year the applicant applies for Nidan (or above). This is a minimum requirement and it is expected that all Black Belts attend as many National Shingitai Training Camps as possible every year. All applicants for the rank of Nidan and higher should be actively promoting the Shingitai Jujitsu Association (SJA) and if they are instructors, they should have a history of being a member of the SJA and making sure that their students are SJA members and use the SJA promotion system to promote their students. 
 
NIDAN (2nd Grade Black Belt)
    The rank of Nidan is an extension of Shodan and the judoka is expected to continue his progress and refine the fundamental skills he has learned for Shodan.  Time in grade is important as the judoka matures and continues in his study of jujitsu.  This is a time when the jujitsuka also “makes his jujitsu work for him” and applies the basic skills so that they best suit his strength, size and any other factors.  This is also a time when the jujitsuka assists a senior coach or starts teaching on his own so that he has a better understanding of as many aspects of jujitsu as possible. The student is required to attend as many Shingitai clinics, seminars, workshops and classes as possible to improve his skill level.
     There are few additional technical requirements for Nidan other than the fact that the jujitsuka must progress in the quality of his technical skills and understanding of jujitsu. If the jujitsuka’s technical skill was a “7” on a scale of 1 to 10 (with 10 as the best), then he should improve it to as close to “10” as possible to be a Nidan. The jujitsuka is expected to broaden his functional knowledge base as much as possible.  It’s best to have the jujitsuka work under the supervision of a senior coach so his skill level can be better assessed and suggestions on individual improvement can be made. The minimum age requirement for Nidan is 18 years of age. Time in grade is a minimum of 2 years and more often, it’s anywhere from 2 to 6 (or more) years.  The student must also be current in his CPR certification and he is expected to continue to improve as an active student of Shingitai Jujitsu.When testing for this rank, the applicant will be required to undergo the same test as that for Shodan and meet all the requirements as listed for Shodan, demonstrating a significant improvement since promotion to Shodan.Important: All applicants for the rank of Nidan or above must attend the National SJA Training Camp in Ohio during the same calendar year the applicant applies for Nidan (or above). This is a minimum requirement and it is expected that all Black Belts attend as many National Shingitai Training Camps as possible every year. All applicants for the rank of Nidan and higher should be actively promoting the Shingitai Jujitsu Association (SJA) and if they are instructors, they should have a history of being a member of the SJA and making sure that their students are SJA members and use the SJA promotion system to promote their students.
 
SANDAN (3rd Grade Black Belt)
    The rank of Sandan is considered a high rank, and as such, the jujitsuka must possess an excellent skill level and participate fully in Shingitai activities, camps, clinics, tournaments and other events. In addition to fulfilling the requirements for Shodan and Nidan, the jujitsuka must meet the following general requirements.
1-Minimum age requirement is 21 years old and a member in good standing of the Shingitai Jujitsu Association.
2-Applicant must possess a current CPR certification from a recognized agency.
3-Minimum time in grade from Nidan to Sandan is three (3) years. Normal time in grade is 3 to 7 years.
4-Applicant must have attended at least one National Shingitai Training Camp within the previous 3 years.
5-Applicants for the rank of Sandan must apply directly to the Shingitai Jujitsu Association national headquarters with the approval of the applicant’s coach.
6-Meet and fulfill all previous rank requirements.
7-Important: All applicants for the rank of Nidan or above must attend the National SJA Training Camp in Ohio during the same calendar year the applicant applies for Nidan (or above). This is a minimum requirement and it is expected that all Black Belts attend as many National Shingitai Training Camps as possible every year.
 
TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS
1-Applicant must demonstrate all the skills required for Shodan with excellent skill (on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the best, the applicant should demonstrate skill at the “10” level).
2-Applicant must demonstrate the ability to teach advanced level skills and techniques to a group of students at a clinic or training camp.
3-Applicant is expected to demonstrate excellent technical skill in all phases of Shingitai Jujitsu.
 
 
YONDAN (4th Grade Black Belt)
    The rank of Yondan is considered a senior rank and the person who applies for this level must possess excellent personal skill and unquestionable ethical behavior.  General requirements for this rank are.
1-Minimum age requirement is 26 years old and a member on good standing of the Shingitai Jujitsu Association.
2-Applicant must possess a current CPR certification from a recognized agency.
3-Minimum time in grade from Sandan to Yondan is four (4) years. Normal time in grade is 4 to 8 years.
4-Applicant must be a graduate of the Shingitai College or if that is not done, get personal approval of John Saylor.
5-Applicant must have attended a National Shingitai Training Camp within the previous 3 years.
6-Applicants for the rank of Yondan must apply to the Shingitai Jujitsu Association national headquarters with the approval of the applicant’s coach.
7-Meet and fulfill all previous rank requirements.
 8-Important: All applicants for the rank of Nidan or above must attend the National SJA Training Camp in Ohio during the same calendar year the applicant applies for Nidan (or above). This is a minimum requirement and it is expected that all Black Belts attend as many National Shingitai Training Camps as possible every year.
 
TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS
1-Applicant must demonstrate all the skills required for Shodan with excellent skill (on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the best, the applicant should demonstrate skill at the “10” level).
2-Throwing Techniques; applicant must demonstrate all the techniques from the revised Gokyo No Waza as used after 1982 (65 throwing techniques).
3-Groundfighting Techniques; applicant must demonstrate an advanced knowledge of osaekomi waza, shime waza and kansetsu waza that is different from that listed on the Shodan Syllabus.
 
 
GODAN (5th Grade Black Belt)
    Promotions of Godan or higher are issued by the Shingitai Jujitsu Association national headquarters.
 
 
 
 
 
 
The color of one's belt is of less importance than the skill one possesses. Ability is more important than belt rank, but belt rank is useful as a method of external motivation in learning. 
The annual Shingitai Training Camp held every May in Perrysville, Ohio attracts athletes and coaches from across the United States. Some of the leading coaches in judo, jujitsu, sambo and submission grappling are featured. At right, Jim Bregman, the first American to win an Olympic medal in judo (1964, Tokyo) coaches the camp attendees on his specialty, Uchi Mata. The photo at left shows a typical workout at camp.
The weight room in the Barn is hardcore and not for the feint of heart. 
What is affectionally called "The Barn of Truth" by every Shingitai athlete and coach is pictured at the upper left. This large barn, located in Perrysville, Ohio,  has a well-used dojo on the main floor, along with the Shingitai business office. It also has quite a few rooms on the second floor for athletes to stay during training camps. The hardcore weight room is located in the basement.
The Shingitai Jujitsu Association has members in the United States and Canada and holds a yearly awards banquet honoring the outstanding achievements of SJA  members such as John Ingallina (center in the photo at left).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    
Welcome Mat offers Shingitai Jujitsu as one of its mainstay programs.  Shingitai is a training philosophy and approach to teaching and learning jujitsu, or any martial art for that matter.  "Shin" indicates the determined mental approach to training and personal combat.  It's the "fighting heart" necessary to be successful in any form of grappling or martial art. "Gi" is the realistic technical approach to performing the skills fo jujitsu and martial arts.  Functional, realisitc and pragmatic skills are emphasized over aesthetically pretty, and possible less-effective techniques.  "Tai" is the physical approach to training.  Functional strength and aerobic fitness are very important for succes in any martial art or style of grappling.  Physical fitness is one of the key elements of our approach to jujitsu.   
    This "Shingitai" philosophy is a fairly old one emphasized in several fighting systems from Japan and John Saylor made it the central part of his approach to training, especially in the martial arts,  back in the early 1980s. Shingitai's main emphasis is self-defense, but also has a national sport jujitsu grappling championship yearly as well as local and regional Shingitai sport jujtisu events held here at Welcome Mat.   In 1984, John Saylor organized the Shingitai Jujitsu Association to promote this philosophy of training and Steve Scott, Welcome Mat's Head Coach, joined this new organization.  Steve and John were (and continue to be) good friends and shared the concept of Shingitai as a central part of their coaching and personal philosophy.  Welcome Mat is an enthsiastic supporter of the Shingitai Jujitsu Association and all belt ranks in jujitsu at our club are issued through this organization.  Our "Shingitai" approach to jujitsu is a serious and realistic way of teaching and practicing jujitsu.  Shingitai is a pioneer in the concept of a "self-defense athlete" meaning that a person doesn't have to compete in a sport to be considered an "athlete." John Saylor has often said that Shingitai is the "pentathlon of jujitsu" meaning that any practical and effective skills are welcomed and practiced in our approach to grappling, self-defense and martial arts.    To learn more about Shingitai Jujitsu, visit his web site atwww.JohnSaylor-SJA.comor call John Saylor at (419) 938-6089. 
Midwest Shingitai Jujitsu Associaton Board of Examiners
 
Steve Scott, Chairman
Sondra Harrelson
Jake Phillips
Eric Millsap
Alan Johnson
Josh Henges
Derrick Darling